January 1945 until September 1945

Attached to Air Group 85 on the USS Shangri-La, CV-38

 

 
First Evolution

 

 

Period of East Coast, land-based training while Shangri-La was being finished. F4U-1A's. Tri-Color paint scheme, with dark blue tops, sky blue middle, and white belly. Fighting Squadron 85 before the split. All aircraft labeled 85-F-(side #) in large white below the cockpit. Front side numbers painted on forward facing landing gear doors. Gun ports were usually taped over to keep gun barrels clean.

29 May 44, NAS Atlantic City; Forced Landing; F4U-1A, BuNo. 50283; side #3; photo no. ATCY 1266B.

 

 

This paint scheme "probably" in use May 44 through 24 July 44 when new F4U-1D's arrived, "probably" using the evolution 2 paint scheme.

2 June 44, NAS Atlantic City; F4U-1A, BuNo. 50532; side #30; pilot Lt. Bloomfield; photo no. ATCY 1383

 

 

bloomfield 2

 

Paint is not glossy, but flat. These are combat machines, and not show pieces. No one cared about the finish, as they do today for a "restored" aircraft.

29 May 44, NAS Atlantic City; F4U-1A, BuNo. 50552; side #20; pilot Lt. Bloomfield; photo no. ATCY 1259

 

bloomfield crash

 

They were regularly damaged, lost, and replaced after only a short period. They were not a romantic vision of the past, they were a tool to be used as a combat platform.

20 July 44, tail up; NAS Atlantic City; F4U-1A, BuNo. 50625; side # 5; pilot Ens. Edwin; photo no. ATCY 1514.

 

edwin crash 1

 

Dull paint, overspray, blotches, flat spots are the norm from here on out. If maintenance was performed, spot painting was done without regard for matching. Nothing like an "over-restored" Corsair of today which is painted to "impress the general public" with how nice it looks. That was not a consideration for ANY of these aircraft.

20 July 44, tail up; NAS Atlantic City; F4U-1A, BuNo. 50625; side #5; pilot Ens Edwin; photo no. ATCY 1515.

 

edwin crash 2